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  1. Winnie Nielsen says:

    The Robin is my favorite bird from growing up. One year my Mom and I raised a baby that fell out of the backyard nest and was abandoned by the mother. We named it Cheep Cheep. Mom concocted a mixture of hardboiled egg thinned out with some whole milk and bread crumbs and we fed the baby all day long with a paint brush so that we could get the mix far enough back into his throat to swallow. Cheep Cheep lived in a homemade nest on top of the corner cabinet (and away from the very interested kitty@#!) until he got wings and tried to fly. Then we crafted a sturdy birdhouse out of chicken wire in the corner of the dining room and added raw ground beef to the egg mixture as he or she ? continued to grow. When it was time to let him go, we took him out to a friend of my parents who lived in the county and had a bird sanctuary of sorts on his land. They say Cheep Cheep lived around for several years rather close to their house. Every year, I anxiously wait for the migrating Robins to arrive in my neighborhood and yard for a few brief weeks. I love to hear that distinct “Cheep, Cheep!”

  2. Robins the true harbinger of spring ! they just arrived here about 3 days ago and are gobbling up the thawed out worms coming to the surface of the frozen mud and melting snow. I have counted 15 hanging out in my farmette. Here’s hoping they nest again in the upstairs window well of my cottage. Talk about a birds eye view, you could see them leaning against the glass. But mama really hated me and would dive bomb me when I left the cottage.

  3. Denise says:

    Beautiful! We startes seeing robins while snow was still on the ground, so we knew there was hope for Spring soon.

  4. Bonnie ellis says:

    Even though robins can stay here in the winter they are truly a spring sight. With our truly spring-like 60 degree temps this week, spring and robins don’t usually show up until late April or mid May in Minnesota. Then we see lots of them on the ground pulling out fat worms.

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