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frippery

Frippery?

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Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Whatever do you mean?

After all, what sort of lady doesn’t gussy up to sip her soft drink?

I suppose you would also call this …

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Photo by Firedrop via Wikimedia Commons

frippery.

Well, nature does tend to show off now and then, doesn’t she?

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Photo by A. Barra via Wikimedia Commons

Let’s not kid ourselves, though.

Frippery is …

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Photo by McKay Savage via Wikimedia Commons

fabulous.

Whether it refers to …

flashy clothing,

ostentation,

gewgaws, or trifles, and showy nonessentials,

“frippery” is sure to be your farmgirl favorite.

I’m guessing, no I’m betting, you’ll use it within the week!

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Snoods

Don’t be such a snood.

No, no—that’s not it.

Guess again.

Not a clue?

What if I said …

hairdo?

Now I’ve really stumped you!

A snood (which rhymes with food) is:

  1. the distinctive headband formerly worn by young unmarried women in Scotland and northern England.
  2. a netlike hat or part of a hat or fabric that holds or covers the back of a woman’s hair

It can also be used as a verb that means “to bind or confine the hair with a snood.”

Ahhh …

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Painting by Adolph Menzel (1815–1905) via Wikimedia Commons

The traditional Scottish snood was a narrow circlet or ribbon fastened around the head as a sign of chastity. Victorian era hairnets worn for decoration were also called snoods, and during World War II, snoods became popular in factories, where they were worn to keep hair from being caught in machinery.

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Photo courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library & Museum via Wikimedia Commons

But there is one last definition that is sure to tickle your gizzard. Actually two more definitions, one of them a family tradition of ours. For some reason—to this day, we have no idea why—but the nickname my daughter and son gave each other was SNOODS. And why they gave each other the same nickname, we have no idea. Even into their teen years, it was Snoods this and Snoods that. Snoodles. Snooders. One summer, I encouraged the two of them to drive across the country to Cape Cod to visit their grandparents. (What fun for a 22-year-old and her brother, age 18, right?!) In the back window of their Subaru was a sign they made announcing to the world “Snoods’s Cross-Country Road Trip.”

A snood may also refer to the pendulous skin over the …

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