WINNERS! Giveaway: Saverine Creek Heirlooms Jewelry

And today we’re ready to pick the winners of the Saverine Creek Heirlooms Jewelry! So Karina reaches into a basket of heirloom popcorn grown here at the farm last summer …

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Our winner for the necklace is Cris Cantin! Congratulations!

Cris Cantin said:

I grow many varieties of heirloom vegetables and fruits on my 1/4 acre farmlette: Green Deer Tongue lettuce, Brandywine and Amish Paste tomatoes, Strawberry Popcorn, Duchess apples and Blue Prune plums, to name just a few. This year, I’m trying some new tomato varieties I found through Seed Savers Exchange, and I just ordered some lovely italian-variety zuchinni seeds from Baker Creek-I love that company so much, I bought all my sisters-in-law gift certificates to their catalog this year, and we’re hoping to make a group trip to their gardens and historical village in the summer. I can’t wait to get into the garden, but I suppose I’ll need to be patient until all this snow melts away!

And our winner for the bracelet is Julia Hayes! Congratulations!

Julia Hayes said:

Last year I planted heirloom tomatoes..an early girl variety and heirloom squash. I bought them from Tolstoy farm at the Spokane Farmer’s market. I have a glorious seed germinating shelving unit that Doc made for me years ago. I haven’t germinated my own seeds in a few years. The most predominant reason is that I tend to over plant the darn trays and then I have plants coming out my ears! Seriously, hundreds of tomato plants…2 years ago, I brought the unit out of the barn, cleaned it off and for the entire time one is supposed to sprout seeds, that unit sat in my dining room becoming yet another catch-all for markers, stickers, school work, etc. etc. The kids are super excited about the garden this year so I may haul that thing out again for them to get involved. Selling the extra plants at the farmstand might just be the ticket. Last year the kids pulled in a whopping $51.3 golf balls! It was FUNtastic!!

Cris and Julia, keep your eyes on your inbox for an email from the farm shortly. Thank you to all who entered. We LOVED the comments on this giveaway!!!

And here’s the original GIVEAWAY post dated March 9, 2013:

Stunning. Look what came in a box to us from a woman seeking her Project F.A.R.M. (First-class American Rural Made) status. I can think of several people I’d like to give her jewelry to as the one-of-a-kind gifts they are. For starters, I’m … at the top of my list and have ordered a pair of Cherokee Trail of Tears (an heirloom black bean) dangle earrings w/turqoise.

It’s hard for me to part with these exquisite pieces of jewelry, but I just have to share and help spread the word.

How about you? Here’s where you can find Debbie Groat and her amazing rural-made jewelry that she “grows” herself. I love it that she embellishes her well-made designs with just the right amount of silver, turquoise, etc. Don’t miss a visit to her website. Did you know that 30,000 vegetable varieties have become extinct in the last century? Currently, we lose a variety every six hours.

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Oxacan Green Dent (value $42): This corn has been grown as one of the three sisters (corn, squash, and beans) for centuries by the Zapotecs of southern Mexico. It’s used to make green tamales. Corn originated in Central America long before European contact, and hundreds of varieties are still grown there. They are being displaced by GMO corn from the U.S.

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Black Nightfall (value $28): This heirloom bean’s provenance is unknown, but its black “airbrushed” pattern makes it one of our most beautiful. We are proud to offer it in our designs.

The two winners that I’ll pull from my garden apron pocket to receive the necklace and the bracelet need to tell me what heirloom vegetables they grew last year, where they bought the seed, and what heirloom varieties they plan to grow again this year. It’s time to do the heirloom brag!

 

 

 

Leave a comment 22 Comments

  1. Gail Dooley says:

    I am growing my heirloom Big Girl Tomatoes from seed that I purchased from a lady 9 years ago. She has an heirloom seed store at her home. Right now the seeds are sprouting in my greenhouse along with all of my other fine heirloom seeds; my tomatoes being my favorite. Each year the tomatoes produce better and tastier fruit. I continually harvest my seeds from my all of my veggies and flowers and trees. I am planting heirloom squash, corn, peas, variety of peppers and so many more..along with my heirloom flower seeds and acorns and nuts. Love doing this. And would love to win Debbie Groat’s jewelry..so beautiful to wear while watching my garden grow.

  2. Jen in TX says:

    Last year, I bought my heirloom tomato seeds from Baker Creek. As a novice gardener, it is still a work in progress learning how to best grow tomatoes in this Texas heat. But I’ll try again this year!

  3. Elizabeth Colvin says:

    What a beautiful piece – well both of them.. The necklace is exquisite….beautiful work

  4. Diane Van Horn says:

    I grow all heirloom vegetables and I buy my seed from Seed Savers. Since they are all heirlooms, I have been able to save some of my own seed. I grew 5 kinds of heirloom tomatoes and heirloom green beans, yellow beans, red bell peppers, kohlrabi, sugar snap peas, spinach, red cabbage and numerous varieties of herbs. I also am the proud caretaker of 75 year old rhubarb divisions!

  5. Jeanette Calarco says:

    I grew lots of heirlooms last year, including some Japanese greens that I bought in San Francisco! The gentleman selling the seeds said that they could be traced back one hundred years. I also grew Lillian’s Yellow Heirloom tomatoes, Green Zebra, Carmello, Abe lincoln, Black Krim and many others.

  6. Eva SF says:

    I had two gardens last year – each one with it’s ensuing hilarity of learning – including the 6 foot tall electric fence (we read the MJF article about 50 times while putting it up) We congratulated ourselves on it’s impenetrability only to have a bunny get under the lowest wire and eat all the green arrow sweet peas (from Seed Savers Exchange) My most exciting item was Broomcorn Sorghum (also from Seed Savers Exchange) – it came up late, but I was able to make a small broom from the small plot of it – I will be planting much more of it and trying my hand at sorghum syrup. Brandywine tomatoes as well as Cherokee Purple tomatoes are a perennial favorite at our house – and we grew those as well – bought at a small flea market from an organic farm.

  7. Cris Cantin says:

    I grow many varieties of heirloom vegetables and fruits on my 1/4 acre farmlette: Green Deer Tongue lettuce, Brandywine and Amish Paste tomatoes, Strawberry Popcorn, Duchess apples and Blue Prune plums, to name just a few. This year, I’m trying some new tomato varieties I found through Seed Savers Exchange, and I just ordered some lovely italian-variety zuchinni seeds from Baker Creek-I love that company so much, I bought all my sisters-in-law gift certificates to their catalog this year, and we’re hoping to make a group trip to their gardens and historical village in the summer. I can’t wait to get into the garden, but I suppose I’ll need to be patient until all this snow melts away!

  8. julia hayes says:

    Last year I planted heirloom tomatoes..an early girl variety and heirloom squash. I bought them from Tolstoy farm at the Spokane Farmer’s market. I have a glorious seed germinating shelving unit that Doc made for me years ago. I haven’t germinated my own seeds in a few years. The most predominant reason is that I tend to over plant the darn trays and then I have plants coming out my ears! Seriously, hundreds of tomato plants…2 years ago, I brought the unit out of the barn, cleaned it off and for the entire time one is supposed to sprout seeds, that unit sat in my dining room becoming yet another catch-all for markers, stickers, school work, etc. etc. The kids are super excited about the garden this year so I may haul that thing out again for them to get involved. Selling the extra plants at the farmstand might just be the ticket. Last year the kids pulled in a whopping $51.3 golf balls! It was FUNtastic!!

    Hey Jen in Texas..I envy your heat. I don’t envy your drought. But we sure have a hard time growing sun loving plants in Eastern Washington sometimes! Tomatoes are especially tricky. Some years are great and others, well, not so much!! Good luck.

    Gail, your garden and work sound amazing. I’m inspired! I’ve enjoying reading these very much!

  9. Freda Kennedy says:

    Love it and your mag

  10. Jennifer Hansen says:

    I am a newer gardener and last year I did not plant any heirloom. However, I just read a story about a variety of heirloom tomatoes called Mortgage Lifter. I will definitely be planting those this year in my tiny raised garden in the city and I plan to peruse the Seed Savers catalog for a few more heirloom vegetables that will work well in Michigan climate.

  11. Kathleen in PA says:

    I will be growing cherry tomatos again, my neighbor shared some heirloom seeds he has been planting for 30 plus years. Two years ago he won the local farm show tomato exhibit with them.

  12. Nancy Lindaas says:

    Heirloom Beans, Tomatoes and summer and winter squash! Such amazing flavors!

  13. Cheryl says:

    Last year I grew heirloom: Brandywine Tomatoes, Cherokee Purple Tomatoes, Kentucky Wonder Pole Beans, Lacinato Kale, Blue Curled Scottish Kale, Dwarf Siberian Kale, Connecticut Field Pumpkins, Early Golden Summer Crookneck Squash, Cocozelle Zucchini, Lettuce Leaf Basil, Elecampagne, Clark’s Heavenly Blue Morning Glory, Valerian, Garden Mix Castor Beans, Milkmaid Nasturtium, Elephant Dill, Mammoth Grey Sunflower & Mexican Red Torch Sunflower. I’m sure I’m forgetting some! This year I got some heirloom: American Purple Top Rutabaga seeds, French Breakfast Radishes, Lacinato Kale, Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce seeds to grow. I purchased all of these seeds from our local heirloom & open-pollinated seed company, Sow True Seeds (www.sowtrueseed.com) and Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds (www.rareseeds.com). I also enjoy collecting seeds- I have some wisteria seeds that I collected from my friend’s vine last year and I can’t wait to grow them! I have a great love of old timey herbs, vegetables and flowers.

  14. jaylyn morehouse says:

    I try to grow all things heirloom! You just can’t beat the flavors. In my experience, heirlooms seem to resist disease better than most other varieties. If we must intervene with pests, we use organic practices, and it’s usually just a matter of picking them off. Last year some of my favorite heirloom veggies were: Tall Telephone Garden Peas, Lacinato Kale, and of course the Brandywine Tomatoes.
    We get our seed through Baker Creek Seed Company and Seeds From Italy.
    This year, I have several kinds of heirloom beans that I can’t wait to try, including the Dragon Tongue Bush Bean and the Scarlet Runner Bean (both in Red and Sunset-pinkish color).

  15. Chrissy says:

    I grew Pruden’s purple tomatoes with seed from Pinetree Seeds. I like that the prices are reasonable and packages don’t have too many seeds, since I garden small. Both pieces of jewelry are beautiful.

  16. Lisa A says:

    I love German Johnson tomatoes, grow them every year. I’ve tried Brandywine and Cherokee Purple tomatoes. I’ve grown heirloom beets, bean, radish, peas, probably other things I can’t remember right now.

    • Lisa A says:

      Oops, forgot to say I usually buy my plants and seeds from a local greenhouse and the Ag Museum that sells seeds from Seed Savers.

  17. Heidi Worthington says:

    I bought seed from botanical interests last year. I gardened with my in-laws as they are avid gardeners and I have a lot to learn. We planted heirloom tomatoes, corn, peppers. cauliflower, broccoli, and peppers to name just a few. We had a lot of success while learning organic methods.

  18. Antigone reeves says:

    I planted true heirloom beans, the seeds have been saved for 5 generations in my family, my great-great grandfather brought them west in the late 1800’s and everyone in the family has them in our gardens every year. Not sure what they are but I do know they taste really sweet!

  19. Eileen V Widman says:

    Oh how I would love and cherish one of these beauties! Last year I grew Rose Finn Apple potatoes and plan to plant them again this year. I also planted Brandywine and Cherokee Purple tomatoes. Golden Zuccinni squash as well as an attempt at Queensland blue. I grew Danvers Half long carrots and Dragon carrots and had great results. I tried Mammoth Red Rock Cabbage but had a bad infestation of cabbage moth. I grew Chioggia beets last year and want to try growing Bulls blood this year. I grew French breakfast raddish and Early Scarlet globe last year with great results so will be going for more of them. I love parsnips and have never grown them before so want to try growing them but do not see a source for organic parsnips in my Seed Savers Exchange seed catalogue.
    I am planning on trying beans for drying this year, want to try True Red Cranberry beans and Provider Green beans for canning and pickling. The other things I am growing are several varieties of Garlic including a box garden containing already growing garlic that Mary Jane shared with me. anxious for it to be ready but excited to see how well it is doing so far.

  20. Debbie Stalford says:

    We grew Heirloom tomatoes, squash, pumpkins and corn. I bought the seeds from an Amish community that I do business with.

  21. julia hayes says:

    WOW WOW WOW THANK YOU dear dear friends at Mary Janes Farm. Totally made my day. This is just the bit of sunshine I needed…Just having a growling parent morning with my youngest who blows like wind and entirely as she pleases!!! Wind is something hard to harness and contain and so has been my morning..THIS is definitely the bit of magic I needed to shift my point of view..

    My love over flows for all that you are and do!! ~julia

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